Listen to Teachers Talk Live podcast ↑ or watch the video below

There’s plenty to discuss in the homework debate. Some want to abolish it altogether while others are fiercely supportive. Is it important in elementary school or more relevant in junior high and high school? There are plenty of conflicting views as well as conflicting research.

What is clear though is that, if prescribed, homework needs to be focused, purposeful and limited to a reasonable amount so as to not take away from home life. Every classroom, school, community and state is different and this also needs to be taken into account when we make blanket statements about what works in each school or classroom.

Our panelists on this show are:

Carrie Baughcum // @heckawesome

Momma. Wife. Mismatch Sock Wearer. Doodler. Special Education Teacher. Learning Enthusiast. Inspiration Junkie…I think life, learning and doodling are HECK AWESOME!

Matt Miller // @jmattmiller

Matt Miller is a teacher, blogger and the author of “Ditch That Textbook,” a book about revolutionizing the classroom with innovative teaching, mindsets and curriculum. He has infused technology and innovative teaching methods in his classes for more than 10 years. Matt is a Google Certified Teacher, PBS LearningMedia Digital Innovator and two-time Bammy! Awards nominee. He writes at the Ditch That Textbook blog about using technology and creative ideas in teaching. Reach him at matt@DitchThatTextbook.com.

Joe Young // @jyoung12

Joe has taught first, second, and fifth grades in the Palo Alto Unified School District. He has served as a site-based tech lead, district tech lead teacher, math lead teacher, and grade level lead teacher. He has facilitated and led workshops on guided reading, math, number talks, edtech and served on the district’s STEAM Leadership group. Joe was part of the pilot program for the implementation of his district’s learning management system at the elementary school level and concurrently implemented a 1:1 iPad program in his fifth grade class. Last year he had the privilege of being in a 1:1 Chromebook fifth grade classroom. Joe is constantly reflecting and refining his teaching, and is passionate about sharing, collaborating, and networking with others. He is excited to begin a new journey for the Palo Alto Unified School District as a math coach/Teacher on Special Assignment.

Oscar Cielos Staton began his teaching career in 1998 while continuing his passion for film oscsquareproduction in Texas.  He quickly developed an affinity for working with low socioeconomic Hispanic families.  “The lives of my students,” he says “very much mirror the life I once had as an immigrant in this country in a public elementary school. Actually, I tell them they are lucky because they have other students similar to them in the same classroom. My experience was that of a true minority in the classroom. Only one other student in my class spoke Spanish!” As a teacher, he established himself as someone in touch with the student experience.  Nowadays Oscar continues his educational journey with the Teach Cow website and his podcast Teachers Talk Live, which brings together teachers from all over the world for talks on K-12 Education.

Posted by Oscar Cielos Staton

Oscar Cielos Staton began his teaching career in 1998 while continuing his passion for film production in Texas. He quickly developed an affinity for working with low socioeconomic Hispanic families. "The lives of my students," he says "very much mirror the life I once had as an immigrant in this country in a public elementary school. Actually, I tell them they are lucky because they have other students similar to them in the same classroom. My experience was that of a true minority in the classroom. Only one other student in my class spoke Spanish!" As a teacher, he established himself as someone in touch with the student experience. Nowadays Oscar continues his educational journey with the Teach Cow website and his podcast Teachers Talk Live, which brings together teachers from all over the world for talks on K-12 Education.

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